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in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations felt in every one of those country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, it's a low boil, ready to burst out in a way that would affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far end of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and spread of al-qaeda and spread of terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate unless we forget within a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challengedded their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama. there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washington institute, for us, this is just the beginning of a -- of quite a number of events
the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado, boulder. that is on c-span. [cheers] [applause] >> all right, let's get what documents the coolidge family during the white house years. and also before. >> part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box of photographs. then we have several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. the album should be in the back here. here it is. unfortunately, it is on lack civics paper. there's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact nature of the album itself. starting to crack, some of these pages are separating. this is a photograph of calvin coolidge the day before he became president. he was in plymouth, vermont, visiting his father, doing some chores, this was a press photograph. so he did have the press along with them. you can see that the
-determination of israelis and palestinians. as you know, every american president since lyndon johnson tried to stop israel from building settlements on the west bank because they understood those settlements threatened to fore close the possibility of a two-state solution. some presidents pushed hard; some not very hard. at camp david, jimmy carter believed he received assurances that building would stop and self-determination and would commence, but settlement building did not stop and carter and the egyptians for different reasons did not make too much of a fuss. ronald reagan called for a settlement freeze without making a big issue of it. george hw bush made an issue of it paying a steep political price which may have cost him re-election. bill clinton wanted a viable state, and he found settlement building cometted whether israel was headed by labor, and, indeed, accelerated throughout the 1990s. barack obama made a settlement freeze that jumping off point for his peace efforts, and he was smacked down decisively by benjamin netanyahu. the reason is obvious. israel, no matter what coalition was in ch
leaders who were lackeys of the united states and israel, were out of touch with the youth ask the populations in their countries, whereas the president of syria was a young 45 at the time. he was a computer nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in
east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization in the digital era , how to deal with the muslims and the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and whether we can, in effect, succeed at that time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it is a new phenomenon, and that is really why i wanted to write the book. i also right about that from an israeli perspective. have been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone during that carter and clinton administrations have was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also writes from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel who has been many, many years and times in israel. so it is a unique perspective, looking from the outside and and from the inside out. >> israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight. >>
's not forget that history doesn't stop or even slow down in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which felt on every one of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, domestic politics in a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and the spread of al-qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dog unless we forget within less than a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama, so there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washin
, of course it's enrichment, it may improve capabilities, ability to go out to 20%. israel and u.s. will feel that the case for military action, low-level violence will continue against, you know, against iran. and israel will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
of israel. they are our friend, and we must be able to be over there and make sure that we're doing the right things for the right reasons. but i'm telling you right now, we've had two unfunded wars which has led this country to a financial catastrophe which my opponent voted for both times. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: well, we all know that 3,000 americans were killed, and we couldn't sit back and not respond. i've been to afghanistan. i've been to iraq. i've served on the intelligence committee for longer than anybody in history. i've been there. i've gone to the tough places, and i've got to tell you we should be listening to our military leaders which this president is not. and we should -- we're all going to withdraw by 2014, both sides have agreed to that, but this president withdrew in afghanistan right at the war fighting time which is the worst time that you can withdraw from. and, frankly, it was a bad decision. we're trying to train those people so they can take care of themselves. in the middle east, i agree with scott, we are a big proponent of israel and modera
talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing o
and israel. former obama administration released adviser dennis ross is interviewed by former state department spokesman. the talk of sanctions and the administration's approach to that country's nuclear program. this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. dennis and i have done this a lot of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as
not just for jordan or for israel or for iraq, it is real threat for region security, and that might be one day like maybe yemen. even american interest. so we are not just blaming united states just because we are friends. it is real. i want, therefore, three times, you know, syrian turkish border. educate imagine how much is becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states past -- you're always talk about human rights supporting democracy, supporting kids rights and human rights. what about the serious? now, i really was crying when i was sitting the kids going to school for two years. and they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the incentive for, if you are just going to -- [inaudible] and i am sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here, and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wrong with iraq, is what happened the day after. it's what you think about how you defeat bashar or getting to be part of a negotiated solution, fine, but i think one of th
amounts of foreign aid to the state of egypt. egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars that we are sending to egypt. we have to say that these dollars are for maintaining a security and peace and if you are not participating, you do not get these dollars. that is job one. we have to continue our commitment of foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally and our sister country come and we need to do everything we can fulfill our to fulfill our commitment. all of the foreign aid is spent right here in america un-american jobs. that is when the requirements. we need to gather up our allies and protect the people who serve in our state department we can secure them, they shouldn't be there. >> moderator: i'm going to go forward, but what you think should be the basic guiding principles, speaking a bit more probably? berg: if you are referring to dollars spent, or in general, our foreign policy, america is the leader of the world. we need to look where there are opportunities to create democracies come and
of israel, amazingly strong stateswoman. one of the stateswoman in there. i felt like it was very important. it is interesting. she has a story in the history this based so much on what we would call his book, but pushing her way through things. and try to figure out, was the lesson. i don't want to the -- i didn't want to -- she raised so much money in america, came here looking for money and found millions of dollars to support and help israel grow, but i did not want it to be about fund-raising. i found this one story that i love. she used to invite other statesmen out to her house bury she would bring into her kitchen . and first, it took me awhile. i don't want to say that she's in her kitchen doing things. that's not the lesson. but the reason she brought them there is so that they would see the world on her terms. she brings them to her place. it's funny. i handed it into the editor. he said to me, i have one problem with the book. one of the once you looked at. i said, was the problem? you use one word over and over and over again. a fighter. use the word fighter in almost every ent
that hope both here and in israel that the squeeze of sanctions will somehow hasten the regime change in iran. in other words it is some other purpose besides leverage for getting the concessions on the nuclear issue and that isn't withstanding the prospect that even if there were regime change, and i certainly wouldn't advise holding your breath and waiting for it, it would mean whoever comes into power and say they would fold on the nuclear issue, not likely given the broad support that a nuclear program is peaceful nuclear program has in iran. note also that a lot of the u.s. imposed sanctions as embedded in the legislation have had other issues besides the nuclear one stated as a rationale, human rights, that sort of thing, relations with terrorist groups, and so it would be very difficult here on the hill to get back down on that even if the negotiations went well with the iranians. all of these constraints do not go very well for taking advantage of that negotiating space that does exist, and showing flexibility in using sanctions for what they ostensibly ought to be used for wh
of western europe, canada, most of our allies, most democracies -- not israel, india and some other countries -- but most countries are due to adhere to protocol i. during the '80s the united states conducted a series of war games, they changed sides and so on and the side that you follow protocol i rules, guess what? they always lost the war game. during the 1990s at amnesty international charged the united nations -- charged the united states air force with serious violations of the laws of war during the bombing campaigns in kosovo and yugoslavia. they brought these charges before a u.n.-sponsored international criminal tribunal for the former yugoslavia which uses protocol i, so amnesty international decried the consistent failure to give effective warning to civilians before bombing. human rights watch complained that the u.s. air force was too concerned with insuring pilot safety. these were american lawyers writing this, complaining about the american air force, too worried about the safety of american service members. so these are the global rules. when people talk about global rules,
in the middle east, it usually centers on oil, israel and military security. and middle easterners feel likewise. they don't think about what are the longer roots of american involvement that have nothing to do with oil, israel, the deployment of combat troops to protect our interests. >> host: brian sand mark, his most recent book, "american sheikhs." this isz3 booktv on c-span2. >> up next, author eric greitens talks about his book, "the warrior's heart," an add adaptan about becoming a navy seal. it's for young adults. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much. that was great. can i get a round of applause for will? [cheers and applause] fantastic, buddy, thank you. thank you very much. thank you. one of the things that's fun for me about being here tonight, as gary mentioned, i am from florida. i am from st. louis, and i have some wonderful people who shaped my life. right here in the front row, my second grade teacher, so, please, help me to welcome pat. [applause] and i know that if this book can have the kind of effect on just one person's
an american citizen. >> good afternoon. i am a local resident and i was -- at the temple israel debate. i am an attorney but i have never ever seen such blazing rhetorical skills. i just couldn't believe what i was hearing, especially when he talked about the wheelchair. on the other hand, i did see him on television one day and he was plainly less than sober. he was really two sheets to the wind. >> i never notice that. [laughter] >> in i couldn't believe that he was able to maintain his train of thought. i certainly couldn't have. i just can't get no -- so i was just reading, this is just a comment. i was just starting to read his biography that just came out, the third volume of the church trilogy, think his name is paul reid and the first chapter deals with churchill plainly drunk most of the time he was working. he just kept drinking and drinking and working in dictating. it seemed to me that is what christopher did with quite a lot of frequency. i just wondered if you wanted to confirm or deny that. >> i would deny it because he was almost never drunk. sometimes at 3:00 in the morning
on in the world. israel and palestine is going up again. you have a lot of things happening. so does this make sense? >> if we had not been in iraq and afghanistan in the last 10 years, his art has a great presence in the pacific. as we look at the importance of the region, as we look at economic growth and we expect to see 50% of economic growth in the coming decade, as we look at the tremendous opportunities that we have, in the context of the china that is rising and economic power, it is clear that make sense rebalance to asia-pacific, even as we continue to engage globally. >> one of the things that is really interesting is that when america was shifting to asia, many of them here said you were going to neglect it. well, at that point, i don't think it was a fair comparison. because i didn't feel that american american resources were stretched to such a point that there is such a zero-sum game between one part of the world on the other. this is not being presented we had an idea about how women can have it all. the answer is no, that there are limits. >> we have continued deep engagements
try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the channel and get an engagement with israel and -- [inaudible] >> put aside -- discuss palestine, it is a unifying ground for arabs and for muslims so i don't -- i mean, again the danger of changing the subject away from syria is really multiple faceted, but those things would be an opportunity to strike a deal between the regime, and maybe they did all right, but it's not about giving back, and we can talk about the development more later, but i think the israelis have to decide actually what is it in interest? is it better to consider that jihadis, dangerous for them, if you will, and couple up with the regime or stay coupled up with the regime because they have been for a long time. is that in their better interest? is it in their int
began by asking about what is happening, and what i think of the coverage of that today. any time israel is involved in the story it becomes an increase do it excruciatingly difficult story for american journalists to cover because there is for the most part a natural sympathy in this country. a sense of identity in this country and many reporters both friends and colleagues of mine, the late peter jennings used to road defeat to write and be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view not so much that he had spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic point of view to arabs. i fink what is happening in gaza means almost any definition of tragedy. they cannot be expected on the one hand to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the great irony of the paradox of that story is because the israeli defense forces are infinitely more professional than the hamas fighters. the number of casualties on the palestinian side are always going to be much greater thereby leaving an impression that there is somehow something unfolded about the war. this
to egypt. you know what right now? egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening israel because of the arab spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're sending to egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a peace. if you're not participating you don't get the dollars. that is job one. we need our commitment to foreign poll to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country and we need to do everything we can to fulfill our commitment. which incidentally all the foreign aid we give israel, military aid is spent right here in america on american jobs. that is one of the requirements. but when you look broadly at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope this would continue deepak civil we're falling into what has become not secular governments but religious governments. we need to be gathering up all of our allies and we need to be making a firm statement that this region needs to be stablized and we need to protect people that serve in our state departments. we knee people that serve in all facets, whether ngos or the state department.
with support for israel. that money is from china. mr. adelson doesn't have anything. that is the sands corporation. does anyone remember the last time frank sinatra sang at the sands? i mean right now it's an old funky hotel. motel six doesn't have that many bed bugs and he said i was just at the sands. where does the sands get these millions in billions? the sands corporation at that little footprint, that piece of dirt in vegas but all their money is from macau, from china. you don't operate in china unless you are actually fronting for the princelings of the politburo. we know where that money has come from and we know why mr. romney, don't we? don't we? barack obama just put massive tariffs on auto parts from china and for all the china bashing that mr. romney is going to be doing tonight, take my word for it, he refused to back the tariffs on auto parts is almost all the auto parts come from a company called delphi owned by? now, so now give world happy that romney is sold 30 with chinese money on mike the reality's family money. if the chinese indonesians. interestingly you will
and shorter. and so, you know, if only we see china, israel, others have drawn is now, the iranians have some jobs right now. it's going to be a very short time frame before we have to deal with the other side of that we are already dealing with cyber attacks each and every day on our infrastructure, not the kind used in the olympic games, similar. so the answer to your question is, it can reinforce existing power structures, but it can then also empower not state actors far faster than we did reinforced. >> i would say that david's concluding point is a fair one, except coming back to us, i think that we have kept ourselves still in this environment as being extremely competitive, and you reference to an area that is a key one for the s states. that is energy. the united states is number one in natural-gas. the united states has been working very aggressively in terms of ensuring that it is energy independent, and it toward this end, just the other day the "wall street journal" highlighted the fact that the united states is now has really grown exponentially in terms of its own oil productio
's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. when president obama spoke about the big yellowbird i don't think he was talking about the big yellowbird i think that he was talking about big bird on tv. chinese oriented people referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that the force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human rights at all, and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we have israel go to war with iran, then we are going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that of really big problem, and we have to put a stop to it and negotiate peace. as i sit in the opening statement, i feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken, and we need to fix it or this will continue whether we have a republican or democrat in the presidency or in the majority of congress, and it is why constitutional amendment with th
relationship. in israel there were some day care centers that had a problem. a problem encountered by day care centers around the world. parents coming late to pick up their children. teachers would have to stay with the children until the late arriving parents came. with the help of some economists, they instituted a fine for the late arriving parents. what do you think happened? [laughter] there were more late arrivals. now, why should this be? according to the standard economic reasoning, charging for something should decrease rather than increase the willingness to consume now. so what happened here? well, something similar to what was going on. before when parents came late, they felt guilty. they were imposing inconvenience on the teachers. but now they treated it as a fee for a service. like hiring a babysitter. and you don't feel guilty when you pay money to the babysitter to perform the duty of looking after your child. the attitudes changed. monetary payment change the relationship between the parent and the day care center and crowd out the sense of obligation to show up on time. wh
for instance we see for example that the list of bases includes the dimona nuclear facility in israel which has a u.s. base attached to it that has 120 soldiers. but when you look at the list of where the soldiers are it isn't listed so it's like wait a minute, what's going on here? it's become very opaque. is very hard to get good numbers. >> host: let's show some have stats from the defense department on u.s. military personnel deployment. obviously the united states and its territories have the most at 1.2 million afghanistan with the ongoing actions there, 66,000 troops. talk about the next two, germany and japan, why we need 53,000 troops in germany and 39,000 troops still in japan these days? >> guest: we don't. that's a simple answer. they should be brought home. >> host: what is their mission there right now? >> guest: their mission is left over from the cold war. these were troops that were placed there to prevent a soviet attack on eastern europe. there is no more tzipi at union and there is no more cold war. we don't face that kind of threat. in japan we are being told that they are
you now, we see china, israel, others have drones now. every nymphet drums right now. it's going to be a very short time. before we do with the other side of that. we're already dealing with cyberattacks each and every day on our infrastructure, not the kind in the olympic games, but similar kinds. the answer to your question is it can reinforce existing power structures, but cannot also empower nonstate airs far faster than we get reinforced. >> i would say david's concluding point is a fair one except coming back to us. i think that we have kept ourselves still in this environment has been extremely competitive and you reference an area for the united states and that's energy. the united states is number one in natural gas. the united states has been working very aggressively in terms of ensuring that it is energy independent and towards this end, just the other day at "the wall street journal" highlighted the fact that the united states is now really grown exponentially in terms of its own oil production. i think were going to see more of that. precious to different powerbase
to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wanted to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic prak practitioner. particularly in my world and to say that the new normal viewed from outside of the world has some good news, which i just would like to throw in. one is that while this is being happening in the rest of the world, china we know what happened in china. but thailand has sufficiently grown to no longer being a recipien
. >> one last question. >> good afternoon. i'm a local resident, and i was present at the temple israel debate, and i met attorney but i have never ever seen such blazing rhetorical skills. i just couldn't believe what i was hearing. especially the report about the wheelchair. on the other hand, i did see them on television one day, and he was plainly less than sober. he was really two sheets to the wind. wind. >> i never noticed that. [laughter] >> you know, i just, i couldn't believe that he was able to maintain his train of thought. i certainly couldn't have. i can't, i just can't, you know, so i was just reading, this is just a comment. i was just starting to read this at august the that just came out, the third volume of the churchill trilogy by william manchester. i think his name is paul read, and the first chapter deals with churchill plainly drunk most of the time he was working. he just kept drinking and drinking and working indicating. and it seemed to me that's what christopher did, with quite a lot of frequency. and i just wondered if you want to confirm or deny that? >> i
at what happened recently in the conflict from hamas, the missiles that were being shot into israel, and the system to understand the importance of missile defense. that is a system that focuses on short-term -- short-range missiles, but we all saw the number of civilians that could be protected by the capacity of having a robust missile defense system, and i can't imagine why we wouldn't want to be in the position to make sure that the east coast of our country would be as protected as the west coast when it comes to an emerging threat from iran. and there's no question that the more we hear about the behavior of iran, the more troubled we should be as a country, not only are they -- do they have a robust missile development program, but we all know that they are also making efforts to acquire the capability of having a nuclear weapon. and so now is the time for us to act, not to find ourselves in 2015 with no plans as to how to deploy an east coast missile defense site to make sure that the east coast of our country has the same protection as the west coast, and now is the time to
joins steve israel to introduce a new house democrat, new house democrats who were elected this month. these members will take office in january, and c-span is scheduled to cover this briefing live at 2 eastern right after the house gavels out. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video. let president obama know what's the most important issue he should consider in 2013 for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grades 6-12, and the deadline is january 18, 2013. go online to studentcam.org. >> what i like about c pan's coverage is -- c-span's coverage is it's in depth. often times you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch "the communicators," i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking, i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to
that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings that are going to be taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we are not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is to make sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements put themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have t
, interconnected. hamas is testing israel. israel is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor because i'm there are a lot of questions swimming in your head. i'd like to propose our panelists talk about the flow of the situation right now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region
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